I’m a Liberal Snowflake

I had a post all ready about the Women’s March, with pictures and links and deep thoughts about it and everything. But after this week’s political events, I think a shorter, simpler post is better.

I’m a liberal snowflake, and I’m proud.liberal-1

I care about people. I like freedom, all kinds of freedom but especially personal freedoms. I am “willing to discard traditional values” when they hurt people. (Also, calling something “traditional” does not make it right or good or fair. Genocide, rape, and war are all traditional.) I am open. I am generous. I am flexible. I am tolerant. I am a liberal.

Politically, I often find myself on the progressive end of the Liberal spectrum. I think the taxes we pay should go to helping the people who pay them, and I don’t mind paying taxes to help people.

I am starting to worry about the future of my country, and I feel strongly that something is going to happen, something bad and big and irreversible. I hope I am wrong.

Meanwhile, I’ve decided that I am not powerless. Kindness is not a weakness. Liberal is not an insult. These are the tools I was given, and I’m going to use them to make the world a better place, even if I can only do that on a very small scale.

I will love people, I will show kindness, I will speak  out when I see wrongdoing or cruelty. I will be open to new ideas, I will listen, I will fight for those who cannot fight for themselves.

I’m a liberal snowflake, and I’m hoping to be part of the blizzard that makes the USA truly great.

LGBTQ History Lesson

I gave myself one, a few weeks ago 🙂

I stumbled across a post about Bayard Rustin and it shocked me. First, I had never heard of this person. Apparently, he was a major player in the civil rights movement, but I certainly never learned his name in school. Which I suppose shouldn’t surprise me. We only ever hear a handful of names, briefly focusing on only the most dramatic stories of what in reality was a long and multi-faceted movement.

652px-bayardrustinaug1963-libraryofcongress_cropSo, I spent an afternoon reading, doing research on Bayard Rustin. I learned he was openly gay (in the 1950’s!!), a pacifist, and a lifelong advocate for worker’s rights. The level of bravery and strength of spirit his accomplishments represent is amazing. It deserves remembrance.

I read a lot of negative material about Mr. Rustin, as well. His sexuality was a major point of contention in the civil rights movement. Black pastors and church leaders did not want to support him, and many feared he weakened the movement. His pacifism was another sticking point. Leaders like Malcom X insisted violence was a tool that should not be ignored, and thought Rustin was a fool for his nonviolent methods. Rustin was romantically linked to white men, which led to even more backlash.

Now, looking back on history, I think his contributions are clear. Though some might not agree with his non-violent methods, many more applaud him for just that. His work for and with labor unions is certainly notable, as is his LGBT activism. But to me, what was most impressive was the fact he dedicated his life to activism on behalf of all people, knowing he faced opposition from so many sides. To fight alongside people who you know don’t fully support you requires an inner strength I cannot imagine.

At the Women’s march this past weekend, I know many women did something similar. Trans women marched alongside cis women who wore shirts and signs equating vaginas with womanhood. Black women walked beside white women whose feminism often excludes or simply ignores POC. I think they probably did it for the same reason Rustin did: the cause was bigger than their individual needs at the time.

I am grateful for what I’ve learned about Bayard Rustin. I’m going to use it as a starting point to learn more about LGBT history! Hoping to post one each month here.

How about you? Do you know of any “forgotten heroes” of LGBT history? I’d love to hear about it!